Postcards from Penguin

I like buying books (I am not going to say reading, because I read at a pace much slower than at which I buy them from exhibitions, sales and shops). Anyone who has spent more than 15 minutes with me probably knows about this already. And most people who have known me for some time probably also know that I like picture postcards. I have been exchanging them with random people or collectors for some time. It is always nice to receive postcards which have a wonderful photograph on the front and something scribbled on the back.

Now, I know some people like their postcards to be as clean as a slate. The crisp whiteness probably works for them. But I like it when whoever is sending it writes something meaningful on them. Usually, these are about the photograph, or about the country. Occasionally, it is about the trivial niceties of social beings. Nonetheless, I like receiving cards and I think they are one of the best cheer-me-uppers I can name.

Last year while trying to decide if I can frame my postcards to decorate my walls (I never got around to doing it though), I came across the brilliant Penguin product called ‘Postcards from Penguin’.

Penguin is probably the most well-known book publisher. It is certainly one of the most respected. Founded in 1935 by Sir Allen Lane, it came to India around 26 years back. With its entry, Indian authors got another platform to showcase their talent. But needless to say, the classics are what Penguin is best known for. No wonder then that the postcards series is made up of 100 such titles.

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Basically, these are just postcards of the Penguin covers of some of their most popular classics. And when I say covers, I mean the old orange and white plain Jane covers. Not the new ones, which I am equally fond of.

Penguin also has other merchandises which are easily available in crosswords across the country, or on Flipkart. These include tote bags or jholas (witty ones like, The Bag of Small Things, A Suitable Bag, Bag of Poppies, The Difficulty of Being a Bag etc), Key Chains (The Lost Girl, On the Road, The Guide, From Heaven Lake, In an Antique Land), Notebooks (The Pickwick Papers, The Adulterous Woman, My Experiments with Truth, The Argumentative Indian, The Guide) and mugs (Life of Chai, Truth, Love and Little Coffee, A Suitable Mug, The Reluctant Mug). The problem with buying them is, you can’t buy it online from the Penguin site. And Flipkart charges way more than the quoted price (Ah Yes! Flipkart actually charges more!!! Imported edition of the postcards, they say!)

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Anyway, these are some of the titles the postcard collection has, in case you wanted to buy or gift.

A Clockwork Orange- Anthony Burgess

The Catcher in the Rye- J.D. Salinger

Class in a Capitalist Society- John Westergaard and Henrietta Resler

The Case of the Careless Kitten- Erle Stanley Gardner

Lady Chatterley’s Lover- D.H. Lawrence

Nineteen Eighty- Four- George Orwell

As You Like It- William Shakespeare

Fantasy- Overture- Romeo and Juliet- Tschaikovsky

Cakes and Ale- W.Somerset Maugham

The Odyssey- Homer

Wuthering Heights- Emily Bronte

The Rights of Man- H.G Wells

My Man Jeeves- P.G Wodehouse

The Intelligent Woman’s Guide to Socialism, Capitalism, Sovietism & Fascism- Bernard Shaw

p.s. My Birthday is on July 25th. 😀

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4 Comments Add yours

  1. Shibangi says:

    Love the post. Love the things you write about. Love the PS.

    P.S. – My birthday’s on 21st July. 😀

  2. Wonderfully stated information and beyond that with a personal touch. Love to get more that what received so far.

    1. Thanks kaku moni. More to come.

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